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RFG PLUMBING 
13007 Hyland Side Road 
Essex, ON N8M 2X6

RFG Plumbing. All rights reserved. Copyright 2019. Site created and maintained by Jank Media & Design 

RFG Plumbing Backwater Valve & Sump Pump Installation Package. CALL TODAY 519-817-7117

Rebate Program

What is the Basement Flooding Protection Rebate Program?

The City of Windsor is offering residents a financial subsidy to install a sump pump with sump pump overflow and/or backwater valve(s) and/or disconnect foundation drains from the floor drain.

Sanitary systems typically drain by gravity towards the wastewater treatment plants. When a large rainfall occurs, rainfall can enter the City's sanitary sewer in a number of ways, including direct sewer connections, infiltration, through manhole covers, etc. This rainfall can cause the sewer system to surcharge and back up into homes, resulting in basement flooding. Backwater sanitary valves (also known as “check valves” or “backwater valves”) are mechanical devices that are designed to allow the flow of water in one direction away from your home. Used on a sanitary lateral, they can reduce the risk of sewage backup if installed properly and maintained adequately. What is a Backwater Sanitary Valve and How Does it Work? A backwater sanitary valve is a type of check valve that is designed to only allow flow in one direction. Different backwater sanitary valves work in different ways, but in general, the type of device that is used in sanitary sewer scenarios work like this: DOWNLOAD THE FAST TRACK FORM 

We Service all Residential / Commercial / Industrial / Agricultural  Jobs in
Windsor, Essex Tecumseh, LaSalle, Lakeshore, Wheatley, Harrow, Colchester, Kingsville and Leamington.

BACKFLOW PREVENTION:
Do you have a problem with your backflow?

RFG Plumbing Qualified Installer

A backflow prevention device is used to protect potable water supplies from contamination or pollution due to back-flow.

In water supply systems, water is normally maintained at a significant pressure to enable water to flow from the tap, shower, or other fixture. Water pressure may fail or be reduced when a water main bursts, pipes freeze or there is an unexpectedly high demand on the water system (for example, when several fire hydrants are opened). The reduced pressure in the pipe may allow contaminated water from the soil, from storage or from other sources to be drawn up into the system.

A backflow prevention device is used to protect potable water supplies from contamination or pollution due to backflow.

In water supply systems, water is normally maintained at a significant pressure to enable water to flow from the tap, shower, or other fixture. Water pressure may fail or be reduced when a water main bursts, pipes freeze or there is an unexpectedly high demand on the water system (for example, when several fire hydrants are opened). The reduced pressure in the pipe may allow contaminated water from the soil, from storage or from other sources to be drawn up into the system.

Backflow means the undesirable reversal of flow of a liquid, gas or suspended solid into the potable water supply; a backflow preventer is designed to keep this from happening. Points at which a potable water system connects with a non-potable water system are called cross connections. Such connections occur naturally in appliances such as washing machines and dishwashers, but they must be carefully designed and installed to prevent backflow. Another common location for a backflow preventer is the connection of a fire sprinkler system to a water main, to prevent pressurized water from flowing from the fire suppression system into the public water supply.

Back-siphonage occurs when higher pressure fluids, gases, or suspended solids move to an area of lower pressure fluids. For example, when a drinking straw is used to consume a beverage, suction reduces the pressure of the fluid inside the straw, causing liquid to move from the cup to inside the straw and then into the drinker’s mouth. A significant drop of pressure in a water delivery system creates a similar suction, pulling possibly undesirable material into the system. This is an example of an indirect cross-connection.

Back-pressure occurs for example when the air is blown through the straw and bubbles begin to erupt at the submerged end. If instead of air, natural gas had been forced into a potable water tank, the gas, in turn, could be carried to a kitchen faucet. This is an example of a direct cross-connection, with an undesirable material being pushed into the system

Back pressure can force an undesirable contaminant to enter potable water piping. Sources of back pressure may be boilers, heat exchanging equipment, power washing equipment, fire sprinklers, or pumps in the water distribution system.

 

In some cases, there may be an almost continuous risk of overcoming the static water pressure in the piping. To reduce the risk of contamination, a backflow preventer can be fitted.

 

A backflow preventer is also important when potentially toxic chemicals are used, for instance for commercial/industrial descaling of boilers, or when chemical bleaches are used for residential power washing.

RFG Plumbing has qualified staff to install and perform annual testing.

For an appointment to discuss your backflow prevention prevention situation call us today!

519-817-7117
If water runs through it, RFG Plumbing can do it. Whether the job is big or small, we do it all.

Call Today 519-817-7117